Jim Zuckerman photographs Portland Head Light at Sunrise

Jim Zuckerman photographs Portland Head Light at Sunrise

Join Jim Zuckerman as he shoots a classic New England location at sunrise. Learn how this renowned photographer works in the field to create his iconic image...

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B and H says:

Join our friend Jim Zuckerman for this great video about *Photographing
Sunrise off the New England Coast*. Also here is a guest blog by Jim from
B&H Insights:

*Use Daylight White Balance for Outdoor Shooting, Not AWB*
http://bhpho.to/IYydHc

“Auto white balance sounds like it solves every issue regarding colors in
your pictures, but it doesn’t. For example, when you shoot at sunset or
sunrise, AWB wants to ‘correct’ the golden tones that we love so much when
the sun is close to the horizon. It desaturates the yellow and red portion
of the spectrum, and the colors look weak and disappointing. By contrast,
if you shoot with daylight white balance, you will capture the colors you
see. The yellows, reds, and oranges will be saturated and dramatic.”

Jeremiah Bostwick says:

It’s the weekend! Want to try to learn some new techniques? Hear (and
watch) some great techniques from veteran photographer Jim Zuckerman at how
to shoot photographs at sunrise. I should also note that this same
information can be used at sunset, although he doesn’t make mention of that.

This video is short but also very informative. Take a look.

Joseph Teeter says:

why no lens hood?

frogsoda says:

he did

Abdullah Alghamidi says:

please what about damaging the sensor from being aim to sun direct ?

Sandy Caldwell says:

why not shoot one of each and see which you prefer?? Great video. thanks

ericgould says:

perhaps adjust the height of your tripod to move the horizon line – keeping
your camera straight 90 degrees onto light house -thus getting your
verticals straight. Great video – nice job.

El Corno says:

From my (limited) experience: Yes they do. Thus, to shoot the sun with less
flare, I choose a prime lens. Furthermore, your prime lens will likely have
less Chromatic Abberation, another important aspect of shooting the sun…

Christian McLeod says:

If you shoot in RAW you dont need to worry about White balance, thats why
alot of people use Auto White balance cause the Light changes so much
during the day.

frogsoda says:

I love how he says a slanted horizon is ridiculous. The videographer should
have taken that advice. The only parts with straight horizons are Jim’s
pictures.

El Corno says:

Do prime lenses in general give less flare than zoom lenses?

AiR Inc says:

Really Right Stuff makes this bracket and ball head.

AiR Inc says:

If you’re shooting into the sun, the main light source in a scene, there is
no reason for using a lens hood. A lens hood is designed to shade the front
element of the lens from light when it’s coming off axis.

AiR Inc says:

It’s made by Really Right Stuff

butterflies191 says:

Great job thanks for information!!

David Dube says:

and, if he did that, what about the vegitation that comes up several feet?

Sandy Joy says:

Tell us about the bracket you use on your camera so you can turn your
camera quickly on the tri pod

Benjamin Williamson says:

great post, thanks Jim.

Ralph Mendoza says:

Join our friend Jim Zuckerman for this great video about *Photographing
Sunrise off the New England Coast*. Also here is a guest blog by Jim from
B&H Insights:

*Use Daylight White Balance for Outdoor Shooting, Not AWB*
http://bhpho.to/IYydHc

“Auto white balance sounds like it solves every issue regarding colors in
your pictures, but it doesn’t. For example, when you shoot at sunset or
sunrise, AWB wants to ‘correct’ the golden tones that we love so much when
the sun is close to the horizon. It desaturates the yellow and red portion
of the spectrum, and the colors look weak and disappointing. By contrast,
if you shoot with daylight white balance, you will capture the colors you
see. The yellows, reds, and oranges will be saturated and dramatic.”

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